Private Edward Evans
Died 3rd January 1920

Aneurin Maldwyn Evans    Back to War Memorial    Griffith J Evans                

Edward was born in 1888 in Llangynog to William and Catherine Evans. In 1891 the three year old Edward was living with his parents and five year old brother, William, at Tyn-y-Coed. By 1901, the family had moved to Berwyn Square and had a Gladys Reese (aged 6) boarding with them. In 1911, the 23 year Edward was still living at home, and was working as a railway porter with the Tanat Valley Railway Company. His father was working as a labourer in a granite quarry and Gladys Reece, now 16, is shown as an ‘adopted daughter’. Intriguingly there is also mention of a one year old Fitzwarren Francis, born in Whittington, who is recorded as boarding with them.

Edward enlisted into the 4th Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was in action on the Western Front throughout the war. In 1918 they were involved at the Somme and in the final advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. In November they moved to the Bethune area where demobilisation began, with the first parties returning to Britain in January 1919.

Sadly, Edward died at 1 Berwyn Street, Llangynog, on 3rd January 1920, aged 32. His death certificate informs us that he was a railway porter (ex army), and that he died of tuberculolsis. The informant was his elder brother, William. Edward is buried at Pennant, in St. Melangell churchyard.

Statistics of the time show us that after the war was over many were left with considerable scar tissue on their lungs due to the effects of gas. Gas was used liberally by both sides and unfortunately, this scarred tissue was particularly susceptible to tuberculosis attack.

We believe that this is what happened to both Edward Evans and Richard Lewis. This is why they are both quite rightly recognised by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, and are included in their list of war dead, even though they died over a year after the Armistice was signed.